01:34:00 am , Categories: 3D Programs

Rhinoceros 5

Link: http://www.rhino3d.com/new

The Rhino 5 development process started more than five years ago with one overriding goal—to remove as many of your workflow bottlenecks as possible. That meant making Rhino faster and able to handle much larger models and project teams, in addition to making thousands of large and small improvements.


Modeling

Object creation in Rhino continues to be enhanced. Rhino 5 adds dozens of refinements to existing tools, some new commands, and the new lightweight extrusion objects.

Editing

Editing complex models is faster and easier with hundreds of new and enhanced commands including:
- Direct sub‑object manipulation
- Thin‑wall shelling
- History support for more commands
- Dozens of new and enhanced commands

Interface


The Rhino 5 interface includes new tools for editing and object creation, including:

- Gumball object manipulation widget

- Object selection enhancements

- Object snap enhancements

- Toolbars with tabs

- Tabbed docking panels

- and much more...

 

Display

The Rhino 5 goals included
- Speed improvements
- Quick viewport display configuration
- Working display modes expanded and enhanced
- Presentation and rendered display modes expanded and enhanced
- Display mode plug‑in support enhanced

 

building capture

 

3‑D Capture

Capturing existing 3‑D data is often one of the first steps in a design project. Rhino has always directly supported both 3‑D digitizing hardware and 3‑D scanned point cloud data. Rhino V5 has enhanced support for:

 

    • Large point clouds. 3‑D scanners have become faster and cheaper, making huge scan files more common. Rhino's 64‑bit support and enhanced support for graphic co‑processors has made it possible to work with these large point clouds.

 

  • LIDAR captures 3‑D terrain data for agriculture, archaeology, conservation, geology, land use planning, surveying, transportation, plus wind farm, solar farm, and cell tower deployment optimization. Rhino 5 added robust support for plug‑ins, such as RhinoTerrain, that provide specialty tools for these new Rhino users.

 

 

Rendering

High‑quality presentation is critical to most design projects. Rhino 5 has enhanced the rendering tools in both the basic Rhino renderer and in support of plug‑in renderers. Including major enhancements to:

  • Rhino Renderer
  • Materials, textures, and environments
  • Texture mapping  (watch the video)  --- >
  • Views (cameras)
  • Lighting
  • Mesh modifiers
  • Post-rendering effects
  • Animation

 

Plus many other improvements, including draw order support, two‑point perspective, and enhanced clipping planes.

and much more...

  02:09:00 am , Categories: Tutorials, Poser Tutorials

How to make newer files to not give "created in newer version" popup error

At times we use the pose files and get the error popup that says "This was created in a newer version" followed by several more popups when you tell it to continue on. This should stop that from happening and allow the older Poser programs to use them as is created in that version.

 

1. open your character file

2. Find this section of code:

{

version
    {
    number 5
    }

 

3. Replace with this --- note changes in red:

{

version
    {
    number 4.01
    }

Then save it and replace the original one, if you created a duplicate to work with.

 

4.  Save as a .pz2 file into your runime |  libraries |  poses |  your-items-folder.

 

The "number" refers to the version of Poser you want this item to be compatible with being from 4.01 until current versions. So if you wish it to be used in Poser 5 and above you woould change the number to 5.0

The second area tells it what it should be, in this case from mat file (mt) to a figure

As mentioned this is a simplified way to do this step but if you wish you can go here and get MatWriterPremium by Netherworks Studios

  11:59:00 pm , Categories: 3D Programs

Maya 3D Animation Software

Link: http://www.autodesk.com/products/autodesk-maya/overview

Maya 3D

 Autodesk® Maya® 3D animation software offers a comprehensive creative feature set for 3D computer animation, modeling, simulation, rendering, and compositing on a highly extensible production platform. Maya now has next-generation display technology, accelerated modeling workflows, and new tools for handling complex data.

It's features enable you to tackle challenging productions. Maya provides powerful integrated animation, modeling, simulation, rendering, matchmoving, and compositing tools on a robust and extensible CG pipeline core.

Browse by:

Tutorials

Get more out of your Maya 3D computer animation software with this series of videos.
View Maya tutorials 

  03:09:00 pm , Categories: Tutorials, Poser Tutorials

How to Make Your Own Thumbnail (rsr/ png) Files

Link: http://www.cocs.com/poser/

How to Make Your Own Thumbnail (rsr/ png) Files:

by JCH Digital Designs

There are actually two types of thumbnail (rsr/ png) files: one corresponds to a geometry (obj) file and the other corresponds to a figure, pose, or prop file.

For 'geometry' files (located beneath the Runtime\Geometries folder), you can't actually make your own- these files are created automatically by Poser. However, if a figure file doesn't seem to be working (for example, if you get a "Out of Memory" error), then the existing rsr/ png file should be deleted. Poser will create a new one and the figure file should work fine.
Note: be sure Poser is closed before deleting any files from the Runtime\Geometries folder.

For 'figure' thumbnail files, there are a number of methods to create your own- you can use a paint program to draw one, use a utlity program to convert it, etc. However, here is a method where you can easily create your own thumbnail file using only Poser and Windows Explorer... no other programs are needed.

The process is to create a second object (with a new thumbnail, created by Poser), delete the original object's thumbnail and replace it with the second object's thumbnail file.

Note: In Poser 4 and below, an rsr file will be created, but with Poser Pro Pack and Poser 5, a png file will be created.

For example, let's say you wanted to create a new rsr file for a MAT Pose (called "WhiteShorts") for the "Shorts" clothing object.

 Start Poser and open the Library containing the figure.
In this example, we would open the Character Library and select the subfolder containing the "Shorts" clothing object.
 Next, open the Library containing the MAT Pose.
In this example, we would open the Poses Library and select the subfolder containing the "WhiteShorts" MAT Pose.
 Apply the MAT Pose to the figure.
(The shorts will now turn white.)
 Add the figure to the Library, but use a different name (for example, add the word "tex" to the end of the name). Poser will create a new figure (or pose) file and a new rsr file.
In this example, add the figure to the library, and call it "WhiteShortsTex".
 Switch to any another Library- Hands, Hair, Props, etc. (This is so Poser will show the new rsr properly, later.)
 Open Windows Explorer and 'browse' to the Runtime\Libraries\(folder)\(sub-category) folder.
In this example, we will need to go to Runtime\Libraries\Poses\(folder where the "WhiteShort" file is located).
Hint: The sub-category name will correspond to the Pose Library you were just working in.
 Delete the original rsr, delete the new figure/ pose file, and rename the new rsr file to match the original pz2.
In this examle, we would delete: "WhiteShorts.rsr" (the original rsr) and "WhiteShortsTex.pz2" (the new pose), and rename the "WhiteShortsTex.rsr" to "WhiteShorts.rsr".
 Switch over to Poser, re-open your Pose Library, and the rsr that you created will now correspond with the original figure/ pose.

How to Make Your Own Thumbnail (rsr/ png) Files Part 2:
With a Background:

By now you you're probably asking, "That's great, but transparent objects don't show! And how do I get the cool, colored background behind on the thumbnail?" The process is similar to the one above, but you use a rendered image as your thumbnail, as follows... and, again, you only need Poser and Windows Explorer- nothing else!

Again we'll create a new rsr file for the "WhiteShorts" figure. The steps are similar to the ones listed above: (new steps are in dark blue)

 Start Poser and open the Library containing the figure.
In this example, we would open the Character Library and select the subfolder containing the "Shorts" clothing object.
 Next, open the Library containing the MAT Pose.
In this example, we would open the Poses Library and select the subfolder containing the "WhiteShorts" MAT Pose.
 Apply the MAT Pose to the figure.
(The shorts will now turn white.)
 Position the object in the middle of the window as you like it.
 Optional: set the background to whatever color you like.
 Render the scene. (With or without shadows, with or without bump maps; however you like it.)
 Paste the rended image onto the background by going to Display > Paste Onto Background.
 "De-render" the scene. (Change any parameter dial, change to another camera, or whichever method you prefer.)
 Move the original figure out of the way so you can see the rendered image. For example, click on the Body and set the "xTrans" to 1.

 Add the figure to the Library, but use a different name (for example, add the word "tex" to the end of the name). Poser will create a new figure (or pose) file and a new rsr file.
In this example, add the figure to the library, and call it "WhiteShortsTex".
The thumbnail will appear- the transparent objects and background color will be rendered correctly.
 Switch to any another Library- Hands, Hair, Props, etc. (This is so Poser will show the new rsr properly, later.)
 Open Windows Explorer and 'browse' to the Runtime\Libraries\(folder)\(sub-category) folder.
In this example, we will need to go to Runtime\Libraries\Poses\(folder where the "WhiteShort" file is located).
Hint: The sub-category name will correspond to the Pose Library you were just working in.
 Delete the original rsr, delete the new figure/ pose file, and rename the new rsr file to match the original pz2.
In this examle, we would delete: "WhiteShorts.rsr" (the original rsr) and "WhiteShortsTex.pz2" (the new pose), and rename the "WhiteShortsTex.rsr" to "WhiteShorts.rsr".
 Switch over to Poser, re-open your Pose Library, and the rsr that you created will now correspond with the original figure/ pose.

Opening Files in a Text Editor (PC Only):

Have you ever wondered how other people editted their files in a text editor? Poser doesn't allow opening of the files to look at the code and double-clicking on a cr2 files gives you the "Can not find program" message. So, here are the steps to set your PC to always open files in a text editor. Not to worry- even though you are changing the default double-click action, this will not affect how Poser handles the files.

For this example, I'll use cr2 files, but you can repeat the process for any Poser files that can be opened in a text editor, such as: fc2, hr2, lt2, pp2, and pz2.

 Open Windows Explorer.
 Go to Tools > File Options.
 Click on the "File Types" tab (wait for the list to load).
 Under the "Extensions" column, look for "cr2" file. Don't worry if it isn't listed, though.
 To add it:
 Click the "New" button, type "cr2" in the box, and the click "Ok" button. (It should be added to the list.)
 Click the "Advanced" button.
 In the upper text box, type a description for the file. I suggest "Poser Character File" or "Poser Figure File", but it can be anything that you want.
 Click the "Change Icon" button, click "Browse", 'browse' to your Poser folder, and click on Poser.exe to use one of Poser's icons for the cr2 file.
 Click the "New" button to change the file's "default application":
 In the top box, type "open" or "open with Notepad" (or whatever you like- this is the "English" phrase to remind you what will happen when you double-click on the cr2 file).
 For the "Application used to perform this action", click the "Browse" button and find a plain-text editor: I suggest either UltraEdit (available for demo or sale on the Internet) or, better yet, Notepad (for free and already on your PC):
 'Browse' for it, usually found in the Windows or Windows\System folder. If you don't have this directory, just do a search for notepad.exe and you'll find it.
 Click the "OK" button to close the "Edit File Type" window.
 Click "Apply" or "Close" to close the "Folder Options" window.
 If it is listed, here's how to edit it:
 Click the "Advanced" button.
 Type a new description in the upper text box.
 If there are any actions listed, you can edit them as you wish.

That's it! Windows Explorer should have automatically updated itself and re-labeled your cr2 files. If you want, you can repeat the process for pz2, pp2, or whatever other files you want to add.

P.S. This method is **MUCH** safer than trying to manually edit add it to the registry- in fact, this process is considered the "safe" method and actually adds the entry to the registry for you!


Speed up Rendering (in Poser 4):

Here's a trick that will help speed up the rendering in Poser 4. Although you may not see a huge difference in render times, it does help:

Whenever you render an image, a status box pops up with a guy walking sideways. This guy is actually an avi movie which Poser has to advance as it renders the image. So, the process goes like this: render a section of the image, advance frame of avi, render a section, advance frame, and so on, until the rendering has finished. What if there was a way to remove this movie? Poser wouldn't need to spend the extra time advancing the avi.

It turns out that you CAN remove the avi file without hurting Poser! Here's how:
 First, make sure Poser is closed.
 Open Window Explorer, (or if on a Mac, skip this step).
 Go to your Poser\Runtime\scripts folder.
 Look for a file called "status45.avi".
 Delete this file... or if you're wary about deleting it, rename it (a name like "xstatus45.avi" will work fine).
 Start Poser and render a scene- the guy is gone!

Note: This trick doesn't work in Poser 5 (and above) since there is no more sideways-walking guy- the pop-up box is simply a status bar.

DISCLAIMER:

This tutorial is entirely the property of JCH Digital Designs. I have included it (in its entirety) here in my blog only for the sole purpose of  having it here should anything happen to his site. It would be a shame to lose any of the tutorials offered there.

Although it is mainly geared to Poser 4, this can be used for any version and with the newer Posers (5+) the need for .rsr files are no longer needed, just the thumbnail .png to make the shruggy man go away.

  04:49:00 pm , Categories: Tutorials, Poser Tutorials

Making MAT Poses (Quick Method)

Link: http://www.cocs.com/poser/

Making MAT Poses (Quick Method)

by JCH Digital Designs

Even though it may seem like making MAT poses is old hat to many people, here is a tutorial on how to make MAT poses, quickly and easily from an existing cr2 (figure file). How do we do it? Every cr2 file contains material information in it. So, we're going to remove the non-material information, change the file from a cr2 to a pz2 and, then, presto!, it's a MAT pose.

As a side note: using this method will result in creating MAT poses that are "optimized": they may start at the Runtime folder (or at the specific texture folder) and include a ":" in the references, as in "Runtime:Textures:vicky:body.jpg".
This is the generally-accepted, correct method for referencing texture files, rather than the incorrect method of starting at c:\Program Files and using backslash character, "\", as in "c:\Program Files\ e-frontier\ Poser\ Runtime\ Textures\ Vicky\ body.jpg" (Or, even worse, using a reference to a folder on a user's own D or E drive, as in "e:\graphics\ temp\ texs for models\ del later\ body.jpg".)


Applications used:

Poser (any version)
NotePad, WordPad, or any text editor

Steps:

1. Open Poser.
Add the figure to the scene. It can be any figure.
Change the material settings to your liking: change the colors, add texture maps, add transparency maps, add reflection and bump maps, etc.
When you are done, add the figure back to your Library, by clicking on the "Add to Library" (the button). Be sure to give it a new name... and remember where you added it.

2. Finding and opening the file.
Open Windows Explorer and go to the folder you just saved the figure to: Poser\Runtime\Libraries\character\(folder)
Find the figure that you just added.
Open the cr2 in a text editor.
For more information on how to open Poser files in a text editor, follow the steps on the General Tips & Information page, under Opening Files in a Text Editor.

3. Editing the file.
First, let's change the "hard path" to a "relative path": we'll replace the full "c:\program files\e-frontier\Poser 4\Runtime\Textures\folder" to ":Runtime:Textures:folder".
The seventh line of the file should say "figureResFile": if it says ":Runtime:Geometries:...", then you don't need to do a search and replace and you can skip to section 3.2, below.
3.1 We'll replace the "c:\program files\e-frontier\Poser\..." in this line since we can see it on the screen. Not to worry, though, by running a "Replace All", we'll also change the lines that reference the textures.
First, highlight the text, starting from "c:\" and ending with the slash just before "Runtime".
Copy this to the clipboard: hit Ctrl+C.
Go to Edit > Replace (or hit Ctrl+H).
In the "Find what" box, paste the text you just copied: hit Ctrl+V.
In the "Replace with" box, type in a colon ":" (without the quotes).
Click the Replace All button. Your file should look similar to the example, below:

{

version
{
number 4
}
figureResFile c:\Program Files\e-frontier\Poser 4\Runtime\Geometries\VP\veepster.obj
actor BODY:1
{

}
Example 1 (original lines)
{

version
{
number 4
}
figureResFile :Runtime\Geometries\VP\veepster.obj
actor BODY:1
{

}
Example 2 (after replace)

Next, we'll replace the slash "\" with the colon ":".
In the "Find what" box, type "\" (without the quotes).
In the "Replace with" box, type in a colon ":" (without the quotes); this should still be in the "Replace with" box.
Click the Replace All button. Your file should look like the example, below:

{

version
{
number 4
}
figureResFile :Runtime\Geometries\VP\veepster.obj
actor BODY:1
{

}
{

version
{
number 4
}
figureResFile :Runtime:Geometries:VP:veepster.obj
actor BODY:1
{

}
Example 1 (original lines) Example 2 (after replace)

3.2 Scroll down to the very bottom of the file or press Ctrl+End.
Delete the lines that start with "displayMode", "locked", and "setGeomHandlerOffset" (see Example 1). The last three lines should now be three brackets: the } character (see Example 2).

...
}
displayMode USEPARENT (delete)
locked 0 (delete)
}
setGeomHandlerOffset 0 0.3487 0 (delete)
}
...
}
}
}
Example 1 (original lines) Example 2 (after deleting lines)

3.3 Scroll up to the very first line that starts with "material" (press the Page Up key). The first material will be located below the lines starting with "canonType" and "conforming" (see Example 3).
Highlight the line starting with "conforming" and go to the very top: Hold down the Shift key and press Ctrl+Home. Then, press the Delete key (see Example 4).

...
figureType 1318
origFigureType 1318
canonType 8
conforming 0 (delete this line and everything above)
material Paint
...
material Paint
...
Example 3 (original lines) Example 4 (after deleting lines)

3.4 Add the "version" and "figure" lines before the first "material" line. Your file should look like Example 6.
Hint: You can highlight the lines in Example 6, copy, and paste into your file. If the text editor complains that it's in a different style, ignore it- the file is text-only, so formatting and style doesn't matter.

material Paint
...
{

version
{
number 4.01
}
figure
{
material Paint
...
Example 5 (original lines) Example 6 (new lines)

Save and close the file.

4. Making the MAT pose.
Go back to Windows Explorer.
Move the cr2 and rsr (or png) file to any folder under the Libraries\Pose folder.
Change the cr2 file extension to pz2.
It's now a MAT pose!

5. Optional: Check your work.
Go back to Poser.
If the figure is still there, delete it from the scene.
Add the figure back to the scene. It should be loaded into the scene without the textures.
Switch to the pose folder, find the MAT pose that you just made, and apply it the figure.

Optional: To make a nice thumbnail image for your MAT pose, follow the steps on the General Tips & Information page on How to Make Your Own Thumbnail Files.

DISCLAIMER:

I have added this tutorial here for those of us that do not know how to create the MAT pose files. It is in its entirety because I feel the need to keep this available should anything happen to his site or his on line tutorials.


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